Author: Beth Sears

The “Customer Experience” – What Does It Take?.

After teaching World Class Customer Service In Rochester, NY, a flight to Philadelphia on USAir gave a number of examples of how to create the customer service experience and how not! A Customer experience differs from customer service in that the customer walks away with a memorable experience. They feel cared for and important and the organization providing the service goes out of their way to make it happen. The flight from Rochester started out with a delay in boarding. Not significant – about 10 minutes, but at a gate across from the one advertised on the overhead boards. Upon boarding, the flight attendant was not very engaging. A woman boarding the plane saw that the overhead bins were all full in coach class and started to put her bag in the overhead bin in First Class. The flight attendant in first class said, “No, these are for First Class.” I would agree except first class was already full and there were spaces for about four bags in the overhead. She worked her way toward the back of the plane and as suspected there were no more overhead bin spaces available. She was told to take her bag back to the front of the plane ‘to be checked through to the destination at no charge!” This now meant she would have to go to baggage claim when she arrived....

Read More

I Know What I Saw or Did I?

It happens all the time, someone says or does something and we believe we know exactly what they did and why they did it… or do we? Every day we spend our time assessing our environments and the behavior of others. A person says something and we immediately put meaning to what they said. Problems occur however, when we do not take time to check out our perception for accuracy. You see, the meaning you put on a situation came from within you and often it was not the intention of the person doing the behavior. That is why 4 people can witness a situation and walk away with very different perceptions of what they saw. Let’s take a closer look at this phenomenon. Every time we interact with another human being, we bring to the conversation every life experience we have had up to that point. Our education, upbringing, religious beliefs, and our memories of all our other interactions, and then we filter what we see based on those experiences. For example, if you had a bad experience with someone of a particular race or ethnic group, it will often influence how you would interact with others from the same group. This is the basis of prejudice, when we generalize the behavior of one or a few to an entire population. In addition, if you had a bad...

Read More

Is Seeing Believing or Not

A survey of most organizations finds one of the top three issues to be poor communication in the workplace. With the growing diversity of our workforce coupled with different communication styles, communication at a basic level often is the fault of most workplace issues. Steven Gaffney wrote “The average employee loses seven weeks of productivity every year because of troublesome and unresolved communication. Lack of open, honest communication is at the root of 80 percent of problems at work.” Many of these problems occur due to a difference in perception. Differences in perception We often wonder how 3 people can witness an incident and walk away with different perceptions of what they saw. Do we question who is being dishonest? The reality is the meaning in any conversation or situation lies in the person, not in the words or event. We all filter what we see and hear based on every life experience we have had up to that point. These filters bring into play any previous or similar incidents we have experienced. There are many ways in which perceptions result in problem communication. Inference –observations confusion One of the most prevalent problems in perceptual differences is when a person fails to distinguish between what is actually observed first hand and what was only assumed, then acts on the inference as if it were fact. For example, a person...

Read More

Leading for Results

Have you ever had a “difficult” supervisor? Did they discuss things with you or just give orders? Did they compliment you for a job well done, or did you only hear from them when you made a mistake? How did this impact your ability to come to work and be productive? What feelings did you have regarding this supervisor? Recently, while consulting with an organization, individuals were asked to close their eyes and envision their difficult person in their last altercation. They were asked to see a door open at the end of a hall and their difficult person walking toward them. All of their senses were to be used. What did they hear, see, smell, etc.? After this brief exercise, the discussion turned to the feelings held by those who had envisioned a “lousy boss.” Even though individuals had not worked for these people in some time, several got red in the face, anxiety increased, and they became stressed, and angry. They discussed hating to go to work and how difficult it was to be productive under those conditions. Your success as a manager depends on your people. Although leadership is necessary to coordinate activities and direct others to a goal, you need your employees to get the product out the door. Effective leaders understand this and have learned to act more as a coach than a dictator....

Read More

Jerks at Work

Today’s workplace is full of challenges, but none is more frustrating than working with individuals who are dramatically different than you. They either have different work ethics or just do not seem to see the world the same way you do. No matter how hard you try to get along, they just rub you the wrong way. What will it take for them to get it right? I remember hearing an old saying, “Everyone is weird but me and thee and thee is a bit weird too.” Isn’t that the truth, anyone who does not see the world as we do must be weird! We often argue to have people see our point of view, yet they just don’t seem to get it. Ironically, it may not be that they are trying to annoy us, but they just see the world differently, and there are a number of reasons for this. First, Myers-Briggs is a personality preference indicator which measures how people perceive the world and make decisions. This indicator, based on work by Carl Jung, asserts that there are 16 different personality types as indicated by the abbreviation of four letters. The first letter Extraversion (E) or Introversion (I) indicates where the person gets their energy. The second letter Sensing (S) or iNtuition (N) designates how an individual takes in information and interprets it. The third letter Thinking...

Read More
Elephants at Work

Lynn Dessert, MBA PCC

Lynn Dessert, MBA PCC

Lynn Dessert is an Executive Coach based in Charlotte, NC. She assists high achievers to be exceptional and versatile through executive, leadership and career coaching. She works with clients by phone, ZOOM and in-person.

View Full Profile →

Newsletter: Stay Ahead of the Competition!

On Sale Today! E-Books to Get Your Career in Gear