The list of assessments grows – 31 and counting

A couple of weeks ago, I asked for your help in developing a list of assessments and you responded with gusto. The use of assessments is prevalent in business, education and as a tool for personal growth.

Sometimes we find out what we want to know from taking one assessment and then there are situations where we continue to look because the one we selected was not the right one.

Recently, I was talking to a Vice President, Human Resources at lunch in Erie Pa. I was on my way back from working in Detroit with a sales team for two days. During our conversation, I shared with him my new web based project that gives people information to make informed decisions before selecting and using an assessment.

Once you have found the assessment you want to use, it will help you find someone who is certified to use the tool or who can help you get the most out of your experience. I would love to hear if any of you believe there is value in this approach.

So far, here is the tally of assessments you have identified as the ones you used. If your favorite one is not included, let us know in the comment section below or in the initial post: The List of Assessments. You may want to refer to this post to see what people have said about their experiences with assessments.

  1. Myers-Briggs (MBTI)
  2. Strengthsfinder 2.0
  3. Cognitive Fitness Test
  4. Thinking Pattern Profile
  5. Herrmann Brain Dominance Instrument (HBDI)
  6. Strength Deployment Inventory (SDI)
  7. FIRO-B
  8. PassionWorks
  9. Leadership Practices Inventory (LPI)
  10. Birkman Method
  11. Leadership Action Profile (LAP)
  12. LIFO
  13. Hollands Self Directed Search
  14. The Gabriel Institute of Role Based Assessment
  15. DISC
  16. Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2)
  17. Strong Interest Inventory (SII)
  18. Rorschach Inkblots
  19. The Rembrandt Advantage
  20. Kirton Adaption-Innovation Inventory (KAI)
  21. Personal Interests, Attitudes and Values Assessment (PIAV)
  22. Reiss Desires Profile
  23. Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode Instrument (TKI)
  24. Learning Styles Inventory
  25. Institute of Work Attitude and Motivation (iWAM)
  26. Harrison Assessment
  27. The InsightMiirror360
  28. Attributes Index
  29. FourSight
  30. NEO PI-R
  31. Managerial Assessment of Proficiency (MAP)

I would like to see this list reach a 100 in the next couple of months. If you use assessments or own an assessment, leave a comment below.

About Lynn Dessert (425 Posts)

Lynn Dessert is an ICF trained certified NLP Coach specializing in Executive, Career and Life coaching based in Rochester, N.Y. She works with individuals and organizations to maximize personal effectiveness skills—a cornerstone to career advancement. Lynn is the author of What To Do After Being Fired and The Secerts to Successful Job On-Boarding. Start your discovery process by contacting her at 585.249.5149 today.


Comments

  1. Ellen Burggraf says

    Hi Lynn,
    Here are a few to add to your list.
    1.  Leadership Renewal Awareness Instrument (LRAI)
    2.  Motivational Gifts Survey (MGS)
    3.  Overwork In America Self-Assessment (OIAS)
    4.  Self-Directed Search (SDS)
    5.  Stress Profiler (SP)
    6.  Servant Leadership Inventory
    7.  Self-Awareness Assessment
    8.  Emotional Intelligence
    9.   Locus of Control
    10. Tolerence of Ambiguity
    11. Core Self-Evaluation
     

  2. karegp says

     
    Belbin Self-Perception Inventory, California Psychological Inventory™ (CPI™) instrument, 16 Personality Factor  (16-PF) Questionnaire, Strong Interest Inventory,  Keirsey Temperament Sorter®-II (KTS®-II), La Monica Empathy Profile (LEP), Power Base Inventory, Strong Interest Inventory, 
    I also developed one of my own based on the personalities in the Arthurian Legend – King Arthur, Galahad, Launcelot, and Robin. I call it the Knights of the Roundtable Attitude and Personality Index or KRAPI model. 

  3. Deepa Bhulescarr says

    Hi Lynn,
    A few more to add on to the list
    1. TTI Personal Talents Skills Inventory (PTSI)
    2. SHL OPQ
    3. SHL MQ
    4. HR Chally
    5. TTI Sales Strategy Index (SSI)
     

  4. Bob Banasik says

    I'm surprised that I didn't see Wonderlic (http://www.wonderlic.com/) tests and assessments listed. I've used thise for over 20 years and they include many permutations of both personality and cognitive ability tests. I have also used the MMPI, MBTI, and others but, frankly, type indicators or personality assessments do not really play a large part in HR because of their limitations. In studying many of these within my MBA program, and also using them in my companies in efforts to boost HR effectiveness; I can lend real examples of their inability to improve results. However, cognitive ability tests can illustrate direct linkeage between candidate and job success. Assuming one properly addresses the job description and required standards process, the Wonderlic cognitive ability tests can be very enlightening. Their basic skill tests and evaluations have proved invaluable, and I would recommend that they be a basic part of your HR recruitment process.
    –Bob Banasik

  5. Barbara Wisnom says

    My additions are "5Dynamics" – a measurement of individual & team strengths & preferred ways to work.  The Leadership Circle.  And Team Diagnostic International. 

  6. Barrie Dobson says

    Hi
    Interesting discussion and list.  Many of the tools listed are truly validated and peer-group reviewed but I do urge caution that many new and old assessments being offered are not.  Watch for Authors/Publishers that will stand by their product should the results be challenged in court by a candidate or employee who feels disadvantaged or discriminated against.  A selection of "norms" is also highly useful to normalise the data against the correct peer group.

    A company I co-own has available over 240 psychological assessments and skill-checking tests all on-line.  ( see http://www.testgrid.com ). We believe that TestGrid has the largest selection of on-line HR, recruitment and development related assessments in the world and can offer you a choice based on your needs – something that is hard to find.  TestGrid does not own any assessments.

    Of the 240, I personally work with (depending on the situation):
    Facet5 – personality
    ACER – 3 separate cognitives being Verbal, Numerical and Abstract Reasoning
    Saville Wave – personality with many different report types
    Hogan – personality and cognitive
    and many of the SkillCheck tests to see if candidates are as good at, for example, Excel, Project etc as they indicate they may be or whether further training may be required.
    I have also seen a great take-up by Multi-Nationals of Safety tests (the propensity to operate safely) for truck and bus drivers, heavy mining equipment operators, and now Executives / Managers / Supervisors who manage these workers.  (examples: Employee Reliability Inventory, Hogan Safety Report, psyfactors SSA, ….)
    Happy to assist you in your selection or direct you to the right source!
    I look forward to seeing the list grow – 100 should be easy.
    Cheers, Barrie Dobson

  7. Nik Plevan says

    Hi Lynn
    I have a few more for you.
    McQuaig.(www.mcquaig.com) Personally I don't like this, but it's another assessment that some people use for recruitment in the UK.
    Assess Systems of Dallas – formerly Bigby Havis & Associates (http://www.assess-systems.com) supply a range of assessments for recruitment and selection, as well as development. They have 3 major product lines aimed at 
    1. senior managers and professionals (ASSESS)
    2. professional sales people in B2B sales (SALESMAX)
    and
    3 a wide range of pre-employment assessments for hiring of front line staff  (SELECT)
    Hope this helps.
    Best regards
    Nik

  8. Gail BUbenick, Psy.D.,Ph.D. says

    As a former clinical psychologist, I am very choosy about assessments in the areas of instrument reliability and validity.  It is my duty to select the one with the best studies in these two areas.  That is one of the reasons why I use the HBDI.

  9. Nik Plevan says

    Hi Iain,
    I don't want to get into a protracted discussion into the pros and cons or any assessment, but my understanding is that the McQuaig system was developed from a tool originally designed for clinical interventions, rather than as a business tool. 
    Regards
     
    Nik

  10. Iain Chalmers says

    Hi Nik,
    Thanks for the opportunity to reply and I appreciate the need not to get into a long discussion – very difficult over blog comments!
    Jack McQuaig originally developed the System to match individuals into suitable business roles based on their innate behaviours, rather than experience e.g. armed forces. It was first used by personnel officers and the reports ) have been developed for line managers.
    Thanks Nik and we are always happy to let you see you own reports if you'd like to give it a go.
    Thanks
    Iain

  11. Jared Kligerman says

    We have the Multi-Rater Personality Inventory, or MRPI, which was developed by Paul Witz, CEO of Witz Training, and validated by Dr. Carina Fiedeldey-Van Dijk.
     
    About the MRPI

    The Multi-Rater Personality InventoryTM (MRPI) is designed to optimize behavioral and personal competencies and to accelerate performance and has been in use for more than 20 years.
    The MRPI has been validated using results that represent multiple organizations residing in North America and elsewhere in the world.
    The MRPI includes a 360 element of six personality/behavioral groups.
    Test items are rated by using the familiar Likert scale, a 1-5 scale format.
    The MRPI is backed by a large database built over the last twenty years.
    The MRPI is effectively used to focus development, to measure improvements, and to support recruitment efforts.

    The MRPI is clearly able to show where employees can develop their competence

  12. Glen Jaffee says

    The assessment I would recommend is truly distinct from every other one mentioned in this list. AccuVision, a family of assessments covering many job families and has been around for 20 years from one of the oldest HR companies in the world. The unique approach incorporates job simulation, presented using video with actors depicting situations, stopping at critical times to ask the participant how they would handle the scenario presented. AccuVision is modeled after traditional role play assessments and has proven to be highly valid and predictive of on-the-job performance.

  13. Jennifer Wleklik says

    I have taken quite a few assessments but my favorite by far has been True Colors. It is easy to understand and very helpful. A great team building activity for any company to invest in!

  14. John Hill says

    Hi Lynne,
    I’m surprise that nobody has mentioned the competency based
    Objective Management Group (OMG) Assessment for sales forces
    or the OMG Key management profile.
    The sales force assessment have a Predictive Validity of 95%

  15. Clare Sautter says

    The Highlands Ability Battery is a terrific instrument to identify a person’s natural abilities and also learning styles. It’s based on work samples versus a self-report.

  16. Peter Demarest says

    A number of the assessment listed above are based on the Hartman Value Profile (HVP) assessment instrument. The HVP is a scientifically validated, direct, deductive assessment instrument (not a self-report). What varies is how the information is interpreted and reported. It is not a personality or behavioral assessment (though some providers’ report may look like it). I would invite anyone using or interested in HVP-based assessments to check out our unique approach to the HVP and how we have integrated the interpretation and report with cutting-edge neuroscience to produce a highly actionable tool. Visit http://www.axiogenics.com and take the assessment for free.

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